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Trump's Personal Attorney Threatened a Stranger in a Series of Emails
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16 Jul 2017 05:49 PM EST

-by Chanel Adams, Staff Writer; Image: Marc Kasowitz (Image Source: YouTube Screenshot via Above the Law)

Donald Trump's personal attorney made threats to a complete stranger in a series of emails.

Marc Kasowitz publicly apologized on Thursday, July 13, after the emails were released, showing the threats he wrote to the person on Wednesday night. The emails were obtained by ProPublica and were first reported on the investigated news site.

The series of emails included profanity and threats and were about the ongoing Russian investigation. ProPublica declined to name the person who sent Kasowitz the emails, only describing that person as a retired public relations professional.

Marc Kasowitz is currently the president's personal attorney amid the Russian investigation. He sent the man a series of emails with the subject line: "Resign Now." Kasowitz responded with a long of messages between 9:30 p.m. and 10 p.m.

ProPublica confirmed the man's phone number and matched his identity without releasing his name. Other details in the email included IP addresses, names of the email servers, and revealed the emails were sent from Kasowitz's law firm.

The email exchange began after the man saw a ProPublica story featured on the Rachel Maddow Show on MSNBC. It was reported that Kasowitz was not seeking a security clearance even though the Russia investigation includes a great deal of classified information.

"F*** you," read one of the emails that Kasowitz wrote.

"No good can come from this," said the unidentified man.

Kasowitz followed up with a second email just minutes later, telling the man to "watch your back, b****."

The man continued to communicate with Kasowitz.

He then said, "Thank you for your kind reply. I may be in touch as appropriate."

Kasowitz responded and offered his phone number, "Don't be afraid, you piece of s**t."

In his final email, Kasowitz identified himself as Jewish and said he assumed the recipient was of the same faith.

"I already know where you live. I'm on you. You might as well call me. You will see me. I promise. Bro."

Kasowitz's spokesperson Mike Sitrick released a statement to CNN.

"Mr. Kasowitz, who is tied up with client matters, said he intends to apologize to the writer of the email referenced in today's ProPublica story. While no excuse, the email came at the end of a very long day that at 10 p.m. was not over yet."

His spokesperson also insisted that Kasowitz does not have a drinking problem. It was rumored that he would work while intoxicated, and other attorneys would have to work across the street at the restaurant to consult with Kasowitz on work matters.

"The person sending that email is entitled to his opinion and I should not have responded in that appropriate manner," Kasowitz said in a separate statement. "I intend to send him an email stating just that. This is one of those times where one wishes he could reverse the clock, but of course I can't."

Experts involved in law harassments and online threats have differing views on whether Kasowitz's emails could put him in legal trouble. While others think the words display actual threats, others believe "the threat has to be credible and the person has to intend to make the victim fear imminent physical harm," according to Danielle Citron, a University of Maryland law professor and author on online harassment.

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