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A Donald Trump Impeachment Could Happen For Real
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17 May 2017 06:54 PM EST

-by Chanel Adams, Staff Writer; Image: Donald Trump (Image Source: Doug Coulter / White House via Wikimedia Commons)

Donald Trump's impeachment could be on the horizon.

However, it might be too early to talk about the impeachment.

But that doesn't mean it's out of the question. News of a possible impeachment has been gaining attention on betting sites. One site from the U.K. is betting money that Trump will not survive his first term.

However, a financial market expert believes the chances of a Trump impeachment are still far away in the future, reports CBNC. His approval rating is on the decline. Trump has the lowest approval rating in history since taking office. Online betting sites have been waging on when the 45th president will make it through his first year. There have been predictions that he may get impeached before the end of the year.

According to widely publicized site PredictIt, there is a 27 percent chance that Congress could kick Trump out of the office. That's still a low number, but it's up from May 8 where it was as low as 7 percent for an impending impeachment. However, it predicted that Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton had 82 percent favorite to win the Nov. 8 election. Of course, that didn't happen and now is Trump's America.

These developments come after it was reported that he tried to interfere with the FBI investigation of his former national security director, Michael Flynn. New reports claimed that Trump tried to convince former FBI director James Comey in backing off about the ongoing investigation about Flynn's ties with Russia.

This also comes after a New York Times report about Comey taking a note shortly after meeting with President Trump to recall what he calls an "odd conversation" with the nation's Chief Executive. According to the Times report, Comey took the following notes in his conversation with the President.

Allegedly Trump said, "I hope you can see your way clear to letting this go, to letting Flynn go ... He is a good guy. I hope you can let this go."

The President also reportedly insisted that Flynn had done nothing wrong. Comey noted that his only reply to the President was, "I agree he is a good guy."

This report comes after a series of press involving the President's firing of Comey, and the next day, allegedly revealing classified information to the Russian ambassador and foreign minister during their visit to the White House. The latest news about Comey's firing, the Russians, and Flynn has caused a spike in speculation over impeaching Trump about his latest controversies.

CNN legal analyst Danny Cevallos broke down explained what is a presidential impeachment. An impeachment is a trial that does not involve a trial, jury, or prosecutor. Instead, politicians accuse, prosecute, and stand in judgment front of another politician.

The House of Representatives acts as the investigator and the prosecutor. The Senate is the judge and the jury. It takes 67 votes to convict and only 34 votes to acquit.

There have been only two impeachments, both of which were acquittals. Andrew Johnson was impeached for actions that were more political than criminal at the time. And, of course, Bill Clinton was the last president impeached. He was charged with perjury and obstruction. When a Senate impeaches a president, it means they're undoing the vote of millions of Americans.

There has been a lot of debate about what is an impeachable defense. The Constitution states that it's oftentimes for bribery, treason, or crimes and misdemeanors. If a president becomes impeached, then the offense or the crime would have to be stated. In Trump's case, he would have to be convicted of a crime or felony and then Congress would have make the steps to remove him.

The only question is if the recent actions of the President regarding the Flynn investigation would be enough to cause an "Obstruction of Justice," a vague term that's under U.S. law.

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