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Study Says Frog Mucus Could Help Fight Certain Strains Of Influenza
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18 Apr 2017 04:49 PM EST

According to a new study, mucus from the skin of certain frogs can be harnessed to obliterate some strains of the flu. Joshy Jacob, an associate professor in the Emory University School of Medicine's microbiology and immunology department, who led the study, said, "We have identified a potentially new treatment for H1N1 human influenza virus, which is a peptide that comes from the skin of a frog from southern India." Some frog mucus contains antimicrobial peptides, which are immune system molecules that have the ability to neutralize bacteria, viruses, and fungi. However, the flu-killing power of such peptides has only been successful under a microscope and in lab mice. More research is still needed to determine just how effective a peptide can be in helping humans combat the flu.

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