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Trump Tells Rally Crowd Clinton Colluded with Russia Amidst Chants of 'Lock Her Up'
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11 Oct 2018 11:40 AM EST

By Laura Tucker, Staff writer; Image: Donald Trump (Image source: Screenshot)

 

Donald Trump seems to know where his bread is buttered. He knows exactly how he built his base of supporters, and two years later he's still going back to that to keep those supporters and to rally support for next month's midterm elections.

 

He understands this so much that he never stopped campaigning. He's been campaigning for 2020 since he took office. Now he's hitting the road trying to keep Congress under Republican control, but he still can't stop campaigning for himself and can't leave 2016 in the past, continuing to hit back at his former opponent, Hillary Clinton. 

Despite an ongoing investigation into the possibility of Trump's 2016 campaign colluding with Russia to ensure his win, he's throwing it back in the former senator and secretary of state's face, claiming she and the Democrats were the ones who colluded.

 

At a rally in Erie, Pennsylvania, on Wednesday night Trump told the gathered crowd, "There was collusion between Hillary, the Democrats, and Russia." This led to chants of "Lock her up." He added, "There was a lot of collusion with them and Russia and lots of other people." 

And of course his claim of "lots of other people," let's you know that this is completely unsubstantiated. The reason the investigation into his campaign's collusion is ongoing for 17 months is because they have evidence leading to that.

 

To anyone's knowledge, there is no evidence of Clinton's campaign doing that. And if there were, it surely would have come to light by now. Secrets aren't kept very well in Washington.  

Trump does have some allies with this theory in some Republican lawmakers and Fox News. But because there is no evidence, and only evidence of the Trump campaign possibly colluding, they argue that the Democrats, the Justice Department, and the FBI conspired to frame the president.

 

"Delusion, not collusion," remarked Clinton spokesman Nick Merrill.  

Joseph Morris, chair of the political science department at Mercyhurst University in Erie, states that Trump has reason to be a little paranoid of whether or not he still has the same support in Erie that he had in 2016. The county voted for former President Barack Obama in 2008 and 2012, and in 2016 Trump won by two percentage points, despite Obama winning by 17 in 2012.

 

Morris conducts a poll of the county as well and found that just one year after Trump was elected, his popularity fell dramatically. Only 32 percent still supported him with a 55 percent disapproval. This could possibly be why he was reaching back to 2016, as one reason he built his bank of supporters was the voters who just wanted anyone but Clinton. 

But Trump wasn't in Erie stumping for himself. He was there to help candidates for November's election. This includes Rep. Lou Barletta (R-PA), who is running for Senate; Scott Wagner, a local Republican congressman running for governor; and Rep. Mike Kelly, another local Republican congressman.

 

Barletta and Wagner are making a bad showing in the polls. Kelly's race is seen as competitive, yet it's believed that he has a 95 percent chance of winning. 

But Trump wasn't only looking back on 2016 on Wednesday night. He was also reflecting on the recent controversy over his Supreme Court pick Brett Kavanaugh getting hit with multiple accusations of sexual assault.

 

"Every Republican thinks they are going to win Pennsylvania, but I got it," he said. "I would use an expression — you know there's an expression, but under the rules of MeToo, I'm not allowed to use that expression anymore. I can't do it. It's the person who got away." 

Of course MeToo isn't about that old expression of "the girl who got away." That's about not realizing how great a woman was and letting her go, only to realize later on how much you liked/loved her.

 

MeToo is about sexual assault. And taking sex from a woman by force. Those are two very different things which just shows how much he doesn't understand about why sexual assault is wrong and what women are protesting for.  

This is added to the other recent quote of his that after the allegations against Kavanaugh, that it's a "very scary time for young men in America." Because to him being accused of something is far worse than someone sexually assaulting you.

 

Despite his hit on Clinton Wednesday and professing to obey the rules of MeToo, there could very well be many women who now realize what they didn't in 2016, that Trump does not get it and won't and will only continue his misogny, both in himself, and his staff and appointments to office.

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