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Michael Wolff and Alec Baldwin Bond over Trump Fatigue
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7 Feb 2018 04:50 PM EST

-by Laura Tucker, Staff Writer; Image: Michael Wolff (Image Source: Andrew Dermont via Wikimedia Commons)

Common interests have a natural way of bonding people together. In the case of Michael Wolff and Alec Baldwin, they're bonding over their common interest of calling out Donald Trump and how they're both getting tired of it.

Wolff is the author behind Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House, the book that calls out the President and his entire administration, filling us all in on what's really going on behind the scenes.

Baldwin has found a new way to be memorialized on Saturday Night Live. While he was known for years as the guy in the "Schweddy Balls" sketch, now he's known as the guy who's been portraying Trump so expertly and so effortlessly.

The two recently made a joint appearance at New York's Town Hall, and Baldwin asked, "Are you sick of Trump?"

The author understood, replying, "Oh my God."

Baldwin continued, "You don't want to hear about Trump again," and Wolff answered, "If only."

The actor definitely understood, sharing that sometimes just looking at that orange wig in his dressing room makes him feel drained.

"I do have this fatigue," he explained. "I do sit there and say, 'I don't want to be this motherf---er again.'"

Wolff mentioned that although Trump has knocked his book and tried to stop it from being published, he believes he'll change his tune once he sees how successful the book is and will claim credit for it.

Baldwin asked again about his fatigue going through this process of trashing Trump, and Wolff answered, "Sometimes, one is called."

"When you do this, you kind of become part of it," the author explained further. "I didn't feel myself looking at this from a big lens. It was very much up close... I'm not thinking about the country."

"What I felt most of all, that everybody there was tainted by this, felt tainted by this and believed that they would not come out ahead, that this was a net loss," Wolff continued. "All of the people around Trump, that was the conclusion they came to."

Still, Wolff had to admit he had no regrets and that he wouldn't change anything in the book.

"Everything is as it should be," he said, smiling.

Baldwin was recording the exchange for a later podcast, and perhaps because of that reason, he got in a few great lines. He referred to Trump as a "drive-by figure in New York society" and mentioned he now saw Richard Nixon as more of an Adlai Stevenson compared with the sitting president.

He compared the cover of Wolff's book to a "cheap" movie prop but took digs at himself as well, noting that his impression of Trump makes it look like he's "trying to suck the windshield out of a car."

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